Saturday, August 5, 2017

Who Would Have Guessed?

Hyde Park High School
I grew up on Chicago's south side in an area known as South Shore. I attended O'Keeffe Grammar School. After my nine years there I moved on to Hyde Park High School. Hyde Park was considered a very good community high school. Because of its location it was sometimes referred to as the "prep school for the University of Chicago." Hyde Park High School opened its doors in 1894 at Kimbark Avenue and 56th Street. That building later became the home of Ray Grammar School.  In 1914 the high school opened its doors in a new building at 6220 S. Stony Island Avenue. Today that building still stands. The community has changed and the school addresses the needs of a new audience of students. It now has another name. It is the Hyde Park Academy.  Over these many years it has had some famous alumni as well.You may even recognize the name of some of these folks: Steve Allen, Fred Beebe, Jim Fuchs, Amelia Earhart (1915), Gwendolyn Brooks (1934), Mel Torme (1944). But, for me, it is still the building where my mother and I each attended high school. That is the important element in this story. Sarah Ruth Segall also lived in an area of the south side that attended this same high school. She graduated from Hyde Park in 1926. Well, years went by as they always do. Sarah Ruth grew up and, along the way, became Sally Segall Greenfield, mother of a daughter and two sons.

Saturday, June 3, 2017

The Stamps of Our Lives

Many, if not all of our ancestors, lived through good times and bad times. Some suffered at the hands of enemies that wanted all of them gone. It seems wars have always been a part of man's need to conquer others. Drought, too much rain, freezing conditions have caused pain, destruction and death through the centuries. Some are fortunate enough to have diaries, letters, or newspapers from our ancestors' times. Others of us are not as fortunate.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

A Different Kind of Brick Wall - the hardest I have found.

When I first began my genealogy work I was looking for specific information about my dad's family, I was not very organized... actually organization was not in my thinking at all. Just started looking up names and adding them into Family Tree Maker. I found information about different members whenever/wherever I could and printed it out. Evan took notes on where I had found the information.  I had hoped that this hit and miss method would help me answer the one question I wanted to be able to answer.  The word 'citation' had not yet entered my vocabulary. In a very short time I had a lot of names on my tree, adding information I was certain was correct without looking for any records that would verify what I was so sure was correct information.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Time For A Better Approach or Why Didn't I Just Do It Right The First Time?

I was first introduced to genealogy about six or seven years ago. How that happened is a story to save for another post. But as a result of a phone call, from a stranger, looking to solve his own genealogy problem, I became involved. In my thoughts each day I thank him for opening this door for me.
And, as all genealogists know  or learn quickly, ignorance is bliss. I hope when you finish this story it will be helpful to all the newbies that are, happily, joining our group and a reminder to us 'middlies' the learning never stops. A part of being a careful accurate genealogist is becoming a life-long learner. Ah, well, back to my story.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

You Can't Tell A Book By It's Title... Or Can You?

There is one award winning author who has quite a bit to say on that subject. Jhumpa Lahiri has written a small book titled, The Clothing of Books, on the subject.  It truly is a small book, 4.5 inches by 6.5 inches and 62 pages long. Don't be deceived by the size, she has a lot to say and reading it is well worth your time. I admit I took it out of the library. I also admit I will own it very soon.